The Lost Valley of Glen Coe; A Winter Hike up Stob Coire Nan Lochan

Glen Coe is one of the most dramatic and most beautiful locations in Scotland; a well visited glen in a country packed full of drama and beauty.

In this great glen, and out of sight from the road, lies a surprising and hidden ‘Lost Valley’.

Combining a short, steep walk to the valley with a spectacular winter ascent of Stob Coire Nan Lochan, meant one of my favourite days I’ve had in the mountains of Scotland.

A Winter Walk up Snowdon

A small silver lining in the clouds of boring admin when moving house is the discovery of long forgotten possessions.

As I prepare to move house for the first time in four years in a couple of weeks, a much needed clear out of some drawers prompted the re-emergence of a long since discarded external memory drive. On it contained some archived pictures of old routes, activities and hiking adventures from way back in 2009.

Taken in January 2009, here are some of the photos of a winter climb of Snowdon – the highest peak in Wales.

Alternatives to Stonehenge; Avebury & Other Amazing Historical Places to Visit in Wiltshire

You’ve probably heard of Stonehenge. One of most famous of all historic monuments in the world, situated in the heart of the Wiltshire countryside of southern England, the iconic ring of ancient standing stones dates back nearly 3000 years BC, during the Neolithic period.

However, in the surrounding area, there are many further sites of equally historical importance, apart from the likes of Avebury nearby, West Kennet Avenue & Long Barrow, Silbury Hill and The Sanctuary are all locations that form the ‘other’ parts of the Stonehenge & Avebury World Heritage Site; locations that show an incredible glimpse into our Neolithic past that sometimes go unnoticed alongside their more famous big brother.

Here are some the best alternatives to consider visiting on a trip to Wiltshire, or if you’ve seen Stonehenge and leave wanting to see more.

To the Countryside on the London Underground; Walking the Chiltern Hills

Some twenty five miles out from the centre of London by underground train, you’ll find the market town of Chesham. In just a few minutes walk, you enter into a world so different from the urban metropolis you have just left behind.

With a recent flurry of snow on the ground of the gentle hilly landscape, I set off on a cold Saturday morning for a walk, armed with my Oyster card and my walking boots, taking this ‘underground’ line through the countryside to discover the Chiltern Hills.

In the Shadow of Ben Nevis; a Winter Walk Underneath The North Face

In the winter of 2014, I walked the short distance from the Forestry Commission Scotland North Face car park near Torlundy, up to the CIC hut in the shadow of the North Face for a close up view of these incredible features that do Ben Nevis the justice it deserves. What Ben Nevis lacks in height on a global scale, it certainly makes up for in character – the north face certainly has plenty of that.

On the Edge of England; Meandering Rivers & Clifftop Walking – Day 2, Seven Sisters and Beachy Head

We were walking on the edge of England; undertaking a two day walk along the clifftops of the south coast of Sussex, starting from the port of Newhaven to a hostel in the pretty village Alfriston, via the mouth of the River Cuckmere. After an overnight stop, our walk would continue along the South Downs Way, along the tops of the Severn Sisters chalk cliffs to finish in the seafront town of Eastbourne.

On the Edge of England; Meandering Rivers & Clifftop Walking – Day 1, Cuckmere Haven

We were walking on the edge of England; undertaking a two day walk along the clifftops of the south coast of Sussex, starting from the port of Newhaven to a hostel in the pretty village Alfriston, via the mouth of the River Cuckmere. After an overnight stop, our walk would continue along the South Downs Way, along the tops of the Severn Sisters chalk cliffs to finish in the seafront town of Eastbourne.

A Short Christmas Day Walk around Strontian, Scotland

Nestled into the shores of Loch Sunart, a long finger shaped sea loch in the Highlands of Scotland, lies the tranquil and calm village of Strontian, a quiet and close knit community settlement surrounded by beautiful natural landscapes filled with wildlife, relatively close to Fort William and Ben Nevis – Britain’s highest mountain.